Implement

Why Does Implement Matter?

To implement is to put a decision, plan, or agreement into effect. After think, learn, analyze, as the last step, one takes action to implement a plan, procedure or course of action. For example, the Army’s ability to sustain operations on land is essential to the Joint Force’s ability to implement foreign policy and achieve favorable outcomes consistent with U.S. interests.

Implementation is important to the leader due to the fact that it allows the coordination of a process, product or weapon system from development of concepts to capabilities to implement change within the Army.


An Approach to the Study of Implement

The study of implementation illustrates how solutions can increase the rate of innovation within the Army and maintain the differential advantages over capable and determined enemies. The leader can study implementation to foresee and deliver solutions to improve combat effectiveness of the current and future force. One must understand the follow on effects of implementation on future war to include the impact on tactics, strategy and enemy actions.

Solutions delivered to the soldier that equip him to win the future war are the outcomes of successful implementation. Implementation is the final step in the think – learn – analyze – implement cycle.

Reflections

  1. What obstacles prevent optimum implementation?
  2. What are the essential elements of implementation in the Army?
  3. What role does an organizational institution or culture play in determining implementation?
  4. How does a leader implement wisely? How does a unit implement new capabilities?
  5. How does a leader foster a mindset to teach the value of implementation to his or her junior leaders?

Articles

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Videos

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Books

Elvis’s Army, by Brian McAllister Linn

Elvis’s Army, by Brian McAllister Linn

In an era that threatened Soviet-American thermonuclear annihilation, the army declared it could limit atomic warfare to the battlefield. It not only adopted a radically new way of fighting but also revamped its equipment, organization, concepts, and training practices. From massive garrisons in Germany and Korea to nuclear tests to portable atomic weapons, the army reinvented itself. In Elvis’s Army, Brian Linn traces the origins, evolution, and ultimate failure of the army’s attempt to transform itself for atomic warfare.

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Fast Tank and Heavy Bombers: Innovation in the U.S. Army, 1917-1945, by David E. Johnson

Fast Tank and Heavy Bombers: Innovation in the U.S. Army, 1917-1945, by David E. Johnson

Johnson examines the U.S. Army's innovations for both armor and aviation between the world wars, arguing that the tank became a captive of the conservative infantry and cavalry branches, while the airplane's development was channeled by air power insurgents bent on creating an independent air force.

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